TouRNet

This site serves as a platform for researchers working in the broad field of tourism at the Universities of Leeds, Sheffield and York.


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Training Workshop: Getting Published in (Tourism) Academic Journals

Getting Published in (Tourism) Academic Journals

Thursday 14th May, 2015  2.30 – 5.00pm

Conference Room, ICOSS, University of Sheffield

During this workshop, we will be opening up the ‘black box’ of turning your PhD research into journal articles. The focus of this workshop will be on two main themes, the first of which deals with how to develop and present your PhD-based research or final thesis into a format that is appropriate for journal publication. The second theme will deal with the mechanics and practical procedure of getting published – what journals are looking for, the peer review process, responding to reviewers’ comments and the publication process. Prof. Rhodri Thomas (Journal of Policy Research in Tourism, Leisure and Events) will provide the editor’s perspective on how to get published. This workshop will de-mystify the process of getting published and help PhD students and early career researchers to identify which aspects of their PhD-based research can make a good journal article.

For more details and to register : https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/getting-published-in-tourism-academic-journals-tickets-16626537421

There will be a sandwich buffet at the end so please register in advance to help with planning.

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Official Launch TouRNet!

Group Picture

The TouRNet Inaugural Meeting took place on Monday 25th November, 2014 at the University of Sheffield and was well attended looking at the size of what is a young network. There are currently about 50 researchers on TouRNet’s mailing list out of which 22 signed up to attend the inaugural meeting of the network.

A brief welcome address by Emmanuel A. Adu-Ampong (founder of the network) was followed by a round of introductions. A short presentation by Dr. Elizabeth Carnegie from the Management School, University of Sheffield engendered a lively discussion about the state of tourism studies as an academic discipline. There was also a discussion about the cutting edge research themes and topics in the tourism field. A key observation from these discussion was the fact that a number of academics do still not consider tourism studies to be a  ‘serious’ academic discipline and so tend to discourage their students from undertaking research that touches on tourism. This was considered to be a share by all members at the meeting who were of the view that tourism studies has matured as an academic discipline and the ubiquitous nature of the tourism phenomenon demands that academics take notice.

The most important point of the evening was the discussions and deliberations on the future of TouRNet. Members shared their suggestions and expectations regarding how we could move the network forward. The goal of this session was to have a set of ideas and an agenda with which to structure the development of the network in a way that met the needs and expectations of members. At the end of a very interesting discussion period, the list of ideas on what to do next for TouRNet began to take full form. The ideas ranged from: organising workshops that are tied to postgraduate training; building a network with local and international tourism organisations (UNESCO, UNWTO, Tourism Concern etc) to offer training programmes; collaborating with other research networks; sharing information within the network with regards to conferences, workshops and vacancies that might be of interest; organising conferences for postgraduates; organising symposiums, lectures/talks that are based on key themes in tourism as well as working towards increased collaboration between the three White Rose Doctoral Training Centre universities of Leeds, Sheffield and York.

In all, the TouRNet inaugural meeting was a successful one that we look to build on going forward. As a practical first step, we have set up a members’ database where each one can enter their details so others can contact them when they need their expertise. To join the network or database, please send an email to: tourismresearchnetwork@gmail.com or check out our facebook page.


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The value of blogging

….should you keep a blog while doing a PhD?

DoctoralWriting SIG

By Mary-Helen Ward, who recently completed a PhD on students’ experiences while doing a PhD in Australia. Mary-Helen works in eLearning and Learning Space management at the University of Sydney.

When I enrolled in my PhD, in 2005, blogs were very popular. There were even ‘blog evangelists’, who would tell you that blogs were the best way to do a range of things, from promoting your business to getting undergraduates and even school students to express themselves. I’d always just thought of them as a useful way to record what was happening in your life, but academics were starting to write about blogging as a useful way to both develop ideas and to share them internationally. There was Axel Bruns and Joanne Jacobs’ 2006 book Uses of Blogs, Stephen Downes’ blog and articles (eg 2004), Toril Mortenson and Jill Walker’s 2002 book chapter that was reproduced and…

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connecting chapters/chapter introductions

…good helpful tips to help in the process of writing

patter

Writing a thesis, or indeed an academic book, means constructing an extended argument. One common problem in writing a very long text is that it’s not hard in 80,000 to 100,000 words for the reader to get lost in between chapters – they aren’t sure of the connection of one to the other and of how they work together to advance the case being made, move by move. And sometimes the writer can get lost too! That’s because chapters are often written in a different order to the order in which they are read, and sometimes they are written at very different times. Of course, sometimes the text is written straight through. But whatever the circumstances, it’s easy for both reader and writer to get lost in the overall argument because there is just soooo much detail to cover.

Here is one way to address the getting lost problem and…

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Welcome to the TouRNet!

The Tourism Research Network (TouRNet) is a multi-disciplinary, cross-faculty network for PhD/ MA students and researchers working on issues related to tourism at the Universities of Leeds, Sheffield & York.

The purpose of the network is to create an intellectual and social platform for these researchers to share ideas and build links within the broad field of tourism.

TouRNet aims to

  • Raise important issues, enable researchers to share ideas
  • Build links, develop collaborations
  • Organise seminars, discussions, workshops, training sessions
  • Provide social and networking opportunities

If you have any questions, suggestions or remarks feel free to contact us by sending an email tourismresearchnetwork@gmail.com

You can follow us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/tourismresearchnetwork and Twitter: @TouRNet_WRDTC.

Many thanks to the White Rose Doctoral Training Centre for supporting the development of this network. For more information on the White Rose DTC go to http://wrdtc.ac.uk/